Montessori At Home Mondays with Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

I am excited to be back for part three of our Montessori At Home Monday’s series. You can view part one and part two to catch up if you missed them!

Montessori Setup in a Small Space Montessori At Home 5 part series at trilliummontessori.org

 

The Children’s Room

Small Space Montessori Setup 5 part seires with a tour of the children's room at trilliummontessori.org

Our children have shared a room since our daughter was 3 months old. There are many ways to help your children be comfortable sleeping together at a young age and I encourage you to research some techniques. A real quick note on helping your children share a room at a young age. Spend time with them in that room. Demonstrate appropriate behaviors and help them feel comfortable with the layout of the room. Doing this will give you peace of mind to know that your older child will act appropriately with an infant child when you are not in the room.

With that, here is their room! We adore the little kitchen. Since it is more of a pretend play activity, we chose to put it in their room. They were not disturbed by it being there, but used it to entertain themselves when they awoke. (As a note, be sure items like this are anchored to the wall so it doesn’t fall on accident.) We added a small tray of empty, unused food bins to help with open and close activities.

Our daughter’s bed is a twin mattress on the floor. We have never had an issue with her being cold at night with the mattress directly on the floor, even in NY winter. Beside her bed is a child size table with drawer. This was specifically Avalyn’s space. She kept her special items in the drawer (usually some kind of hair brush) and the books she was interested in on top.

Our son’s bed is on a frame. This gave him a little of his own space since his sister couldn’t get on the bed on her own.

Small Space Montessori Setup 5 part series with a tour of the children's room at trilliummontessori.org

As a way to continue our homeschool setup in the children’s room, we added another bookshelf. This too was FREE! Hand me down from my mother in law with new coat of paint.

We added a bath mat as a work space and kept some fine motor work in their room along with plenty of books!

Beside the shelf is a small treasure chest. This is for Samuel’s special things. Every boy needs a treasure chest!

The door you see leads to the only closet in the house.

The Closet

This walk-in closet proved to be extremely useful for our small space Montessori setup. Storage space, diaper changing area, and clothes storage for our family of four. We will look at only the children’s side.

Small Space Montessori Setup 5 part series with a tour of the only closet in the small home at trilliummontessori.org

The dresser in the closet is for the children’s clothes. I added a couple of hooks to the side for easy access for the children to hang their jackets. Avalyn’s changing station consisted of a changing mat on the floor under their hanging clothes. Her diapers are in bins on top of the dresser.

Small Space Montessori Setup 5 part series with a tour of the storage space in the only closet in the small home at trilliummontessori.org

Above their clothes is a high shelf. High shelves are a must have for small spaces. We stored all of the extra puzzles, baby memorabilia, games, and a couple baskets of those pesky toys that don’t stack well. As you can see it is stacked to the ceiling, but it was great to have all the activities I wanted to switch out for the kids in the apartment. I would recommend fitting in a high shelf for storage in any small home.

Small Space Montessori Setup 5 part series with a tour of the low shelves in the children's dresser at trilliummontessori.org

Since Avalyn was still a little young to dress herself, we decided to put Samuel’s clothes in the bottom two drawers of the dresser. (Also, a hand me down! I love free!) We organized his clothes to be in a specific place. A place for everything and everything in its place has always worked well for our home. Sam was able to open and close these drawers on his own so this became another practical life area.

Check back next Monday for our Small Space Montessori Setup post where we will go over how we setup our bathroom to include a Montessori toilet learning space.

About Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Marie is a work-at-home mother of two. She co- blogs at Montessori on a Budget with Kimberly Huff and Lisa Nolan. She is also a contributor to Confessions of a Montessori Mom blog. After much self-study and with a background in education, she chose to follow her own children in their education and created the blog Child Led Life. She would love to hear from you on FacebookPinterest, and G+.

Thank you for checking out our Small Space Montessori Setup!

{ 0 comments }

This week I’d like to introduce you to the talented Nicole Kavanaugh.  I first found Nicole when I was looking for resources to share with the parents at our school about how to set up their homes in a Montessori friendly way.  I loved how she had her bathroom set up to help her little ones be as independent as possible.  Check out all the areas of her home for some great inspiration!

Montessori Bathroom
Montessori Bedroom
Montessori Closet
Montessori Playroom
Montessori Homeschool Classroom

-Seemi


 

Montessori at Home and on a Budget Kavanaugh Report

Hi! I’m Nicole from The Kavanaugh Report, where I blog about using Montessori principles in my home with my 3.5 year old son and my newborn daughter. I also host a tot school co-op and share the DIY work I create.

When people hear that we use Montessori ideas in our home, I’m pretty sure they think it requires expensive customized equipment and work. While this can be true in a school setting (although there are plenty of DIY options there too), using Montessori at home can be a lot different.

In fact, in my opinion, it’s all about making your home accessible to your children to foster independence within a nurturing prepared environment. But, how do you do this on a budget? Use what you have and thrift stores, thrift stores, thrift stores!

For me, one of the best and easiest places to cheaply incorporate Montessori is with my children’s toys. I do this using trays, baskets, and bowls. Instead of giant toy bins, try placing a few selected toys on a shelf in a specific container. These containers can be purchased at local thrift stores very cheaply. All of the ones I have used in this post cost me $2 or less. When looking for stuff at thrift keep a few things in mind:

Size — you want something that your child can easily pick up and move. If it’s too small nothing will fit on it and you won’t use it. If it’s too big, your child won’t use it because it won’t be comfortable for them.

Material — natural materials like wood, wicker, metal or glass are preferred in Montessori environments. I try to use a mix of all these materials in all areas of our home.

Cost — Children can be rough, and grow out of things quickly out of things. Find things for cheap is important!

Supply — never pay too much for any of these things, many can be found again! Check multiple thrift stores, garage sales and clearance sections for the best deals.

Montessori Trays Baskets and Bowls Kavanaugh Report

Here are a few ideas on how I use each type container and what I look for when I’m buying them!

Trays — These are my favorite and probably the most versatile. All sorts of sizes can be used. Larger trays are great for art or puzzles. Smaller trays are perfect for keeping smaller toys organized. They can also be used to make bathroom and food prep items accessible.

When looking for trays, try to find ones with handles. I find those are the easiest to use. Also, avoid trays that are too big or heavy. Wicker trays can be a great alternative since they are lighter, but I find stuff slides around more on those trays.

Baskets — Baskets are great for loose pieces of all sizes! We use them for stuffed animals, legos, wooden blocks and more. We also use baskets so my son has easy access to his socks and undies. They are also perfect for a baby toy. Since they are lightweight, babies can pull them from the shelf without hurting themselves and they provide a good way for babies to learn to place something back in its place.

Baskets are the easiest thing for me to find cheaply. But, I’ve learned there are different qualities of baskets. Look for ones that are sturdy and aren’t cracked or broken. Craft stores often have new baskets on sale or clearance too. I like to have a variety of these from tiny to large, there’s always a use for these.

Wooden Bowls — I use these for small work or organizing a larger tray. I love these little bowls because they hold up the best and are often the prettiest. But, keep them small, I’ve bought plenty of larger ones that sit around unused because they are just too heavy for kids to use. However, these are the ones I will pay the most money for — they tend to be in the lowest supply and the nicest to look at.

Montessori at Home Kavanaugh Report


Nicole

Thank you Trillium Montessori for letting me share these tips. I hope they help you incorporate a little Montessori into your home without spending tons of money! For more ideas on how to use Montessori principles in your home, stop by The Kavanaugh Report, or follow me on FacebookInstagram or Pinterest!


Free Printables
Are you new to our blog?  Enter your information below to sign up for email updates.  Subscribers also get access to our Subscribers Only page where we host our growing collection of FREE printables.




You may also want to follow us on Pinterest or Facebook and check out our other printables on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Affiliate links may be used in this post at no additional cost to you.

Linked to these great blogs.

{ 0 comments }

Montessori At Home Mondays with Marie Mack

Montessori Setup in a Small Space

Thank you, Seemi, for having me back for part two of our Montessori At Home Monday’s series. If you missed part one, check it out here!

I would love to show you around our living room next. We used this space for EVERYTHING! Our living room is the classroom, playroom, community room, and reading room all in one.

Montessori Setup in a Small Space Montessori at home 5 part series

 

It is a great space for a lot of wonderful family time without having to clean up an entire house at the end of the day. As a busy mom, there are big perks to living in a small home.

Small Space Setup Living Room

The first item in our living space is a tall bookshelf. This shelf was headed to the dumpster at my husband’s work. Solid wood and very sturdy. (I love it!)

On the bottom two shelves I have practical life trays. The bottom shelf is intended for my youngest and the next shelf up for my oldest. Although they both work with the materials, I wanted to be sure there was enough challenge for my oldest.

The upper shelves, even the very top, is storage for activities and toys I rotate. I asked my children not to take those items down without asking me. This is an organizational decision that worked well and helped them focus on the work I already had out. I used clear bins to easily identify the materials inside and stacked as high as I could on the top shelf to get the most out of my vertical space.

Living Room

The rest of our common living space looked like this. The white shelf has some math and language work, a couple things for each child. The lower shelves for the younger child and upper shelves for the older. The green pillows and basket served as our reading space and where we did our circle time activities. The chalk board against the wall became an art space. The black shelves were also a find before they headed to the dumpster. This set of shelves I reserved for play items. Puzzles, play-dough, and special books on the topic we were discussing that week. There is also set of drawers there, that is hard to see in the picture. This stored my extra materials for helping Samuel with beginning learning and drawing materials.

You can see my bed behind a little divider. My husband and I chose to sleep in the open living space to give our children the room in our one bedroom apartment. Let’s tour there next Monday.

Check back next Monday where we will go over how we setup our children’s room to include a Montessori learning space.

About Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Marie is a work-at-home mother of two. She co- blogs at Montessori on a Budget with Kimberly Huff and Lisa Nolan. She is also a contributor to Confessions of a Montessori Mom blog. After much self-study and with a background in education, she chose to follow her own children in their education and created the blog Child Led Life. She would love to hear from you on Facebook, Pinterest, and G+.

{ 0 comments }

Today I’m honored to share with you a guest post written by my friend, Heidi Walker.  Heidi is a mother to three children and a certified Parent Effectiveness Training instructor.  We’ve had the pleasure of having her come and speak at our school and share her wisdom with our parents in the past and are looking forward to having her visit again this year.  Enjoy!
-Seemi

This School Year I Will Be Mostly Listening

A few years ago I learned how to really listen.  I realize now that before I honed my listening skills I was hearing my children but I wasn’t really listening.  Instead of really listening I was thinking about my response, or I was wishing that they weren’t feeling a certain way, or wishing that they weren’t experiencing something.  These were the thoughts that occupied my mind and for that reason I could not truly be listening.
.
.
Before I learned to listen I sat in silence while my daughter, then four, shared with me her sadness at being left out of a triangle of friends.  The silence would have been a fine reaction had it not been for the fact that the thoughts running through my head were “Darn, she is a sensitive child, just like I was.  Life is so much harder if you take things personally.  I wish she wasn’t sensitive.”
.
.
During my silence I was having flashbacks to my own similar childhood experiences which would have been fine except for the fact that my inner dialogue would continue;  “I don’t know what to tell her to make it better.”  I knew that when my own Mom had said “Just go find someone else to play with” that it really didn’t help.  I would think to my self “I just wish I knew what to say that would help.”  So I was not really listening well because I was so consumed with my own thoughts.
.
.
I learned how to really listen when my daughter was nine.  The same situation presented itself again and she shared with me her sadness at being left out of a triangle of friends.  Again I was silent but now the energy in my silence was different.  Because I had learned how to listen I knew how to really be present with my daughter.  After I learned how to really listen I was much more focused on my daughter and hearing what she was telling me.  I learned that I did not need the answers.  I learned that instead of wanting to take away the situation for her that it was better to acknowledge the upset she was experiencing with a simple statement “You felt lonely at school today.”  I learned that if I really listened to her response that I would learn a bit more about the situation.
.
.
You cannot teach a man anything,  You can only help him find it within himself. - Galileo
.
.
After I learned how to really listen I knew that the more my daughter was able to share about the experience causing the upset, the closer she came to finding her own solution to the matter.  I learned that I didn’t need the answers, she would come to those on her own.  I learned that sometimes life is lonely and that is okay.  When I learned how to really listen I realized that it is not my job as a parent to make everyday a good day or to stop the bad days from happening.  I learned that it is my job as a parent to be there for my children when things do happen and to really listen to how they are experiencing life.
.
.
When I learned how to really listen I gave my children the gift of acceptance regardless of the emotion it was they were feeling.  I showed them what empathy is and they experienced what it feels like to really be listened to.  Most importantly I taught them how to listen by my example.
.
.
As the school year starts listen for the good days and the bad days.  The days when a new friend is made and when one is lost.  Listen for the elation of learning a new skill and the frustration of not quite getting the hang of it.  Listen for the excitement of a new routine and the fear of change.  Listen for the days when everything went well and the days when something in their behavior indicates things could have been better.  In each of those moments acknowledge what they are feeling and experiencing and then let them show you the way.  Less is more when it comes to learning how to really listen.
.
.

.
.
Heidi Mulligan WalkerHeidi Mulligan Walker is a mother to three children and is a Family Connection Coach and Founder of The Difference.  As a certified Parent Effectiveness Training Instructor she helps families to connect and thrive by sharing the communication techniques pioneered by Dr. Thomas Gordon.  Heidi and her family relocated to Cary, NC in 2012 after living abroad in the UK and China for the past 18 years.  She is loving sharing the American experience with her husband and young family.  She writes a weekly blog for The News & Observer’s Triangle Mom2Mom section called Parenting for All Seasons and is also a regular contributor to Huffington Post Parents.  You can visit her website and follow her on Facebook and Twitter @heididifference.  She is also the co-author of Inspiring Global Entrepreneurs
.
.

 

.

Free Printables
Are you new to our blog?  Enter your information below to sign up for email updates.  Subscribers also get access to our Subscribers Only page where we host our growing collection of FREE printables.




You may also want to follow us on Pinterest or Facebook and check out our other printables on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Affiliate links may be used in this post at no additional cost to you.

Linked to these great blogs.

{ 2 comments }


I’m excited to introduce you today to my friend Marie.  Marie has a passion for incorporating Montessori principles into day to day life with her two adorable children.  She has graciously agreed to write a series of articles for us, focusing on setting up your home in a Montessori friendly way when you live in a small space. Check back every Monday in September for “Montessori at Home Mondays”!

-Seemi

 

Montessori At Home Mondays with Marie Mack

 

Montessori Setup in a Small Space

The Montessori Method is versatile in so many beautiful ways. The world is the classroom and even a small space can be used to engage young learners. I would love to show you some of the ways we have our small space Montessori setup with Montessori At Home Mondays five part series. Check back each Monday in the month of September where I will give you a tour of our small space Montessori setup.

Montessori Setup in a Small Space by Marie Mack of ChildLedLife

I am grateful to be here at Trillium Montessori. Thank you, Seemi, for this opportunity!

We have lived in all sized homes after traveling the country for many years as a military family. Through it all, I have noticed one thing. Young children want to be wherever you are! No matter how big or small your living space is, more than likely they will be within arm’s reach. With this in mind, we found ourselves living in smaller and smaller homes. The smallest home our family of four lived in was a one bedroom apartment without a balcony, in the city.

Our family is an outdoor family so having a small space Montessori setup in the city was a bit of a challenge, but we found some of our most rewarding lessons from this space.

I found the secret to Montessori homeschooling in small spaces is to use the vertical space for storage and to leave only a select amount of activities out at one time. Rotating activities often throughout the house can keep your child’s interest when there is not a lot of space to run around.

Samuel was 3 years old when we lived in this space and Avalyn was 18 months. Much of our Montessori work around the house focuses on practical life work since these are appropriate lessons for their age group.

Let me show you around our small space setup!

Small Space Montessori Setup

The Entryway

The common space in a small home is used very often. This is the classroom, playroom, community room, and reading room all in one. I divided the living room in our one bedroom apartment into different free flowing areas.

Small Space Montessori Setup Entryway

We start with our entry way. We have a small mat for shoes and a child size bench. Our routine was to sit on the bench to put shoes on before we left and then again to take them off when we got home. My children did this without prompting since this was a consistent routine of our practical life work.

Check back next Monday where we will go over how we use free shelves in our living room to create a budget friendly Montessori space  for our children.

About Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Marie is a work-at-home mother of two. She co- blogs at Montessori on a Budget with Kimberly Huff and Lisa Nolan. She is also a contributor to Confessions of a Montessori Mom blog. After much self-study and with a background in education, she chose to follow her own children in their education and created the blog Child Led Life. She would love to hear from you on FacebookPinterest, and G+.

{ 2 comments }

Are Sandpaper Letters Enough?

by on August 29, 2014

in Language

This post is written by my friend Cathie Perolman, a long time Montessorian with over 3 decades of experience!  Today she is sharing her language program with us.  I have been very inspired by Cathie’s work and have used it as a basis for the organization of my own language shelves.  I’m sure you will get a ton of ideas that you can use in your classroom! 

-Seemi

A Guest Post by Cathie Perolman

Maria Montessori invented the sandpaper letters and they are a cornerstone of the Montessori Method and a fabulous material!  But in order to progress through the sandpaper letters, a child needs the attention and focus of an adult or an older child.  Sometimes a child wants to work with letter sounds but an adult is not available. How can we meet these needs and reinforce these skills?

I decided early in my career that 26 sounds are way too many to consider offering to a child. That quantity looks and feels overwhelming- even scary! Children need subsets to feel success and progress. In that spirit, I have grouped my sand paper letters into six groups. Each group (except the last one) consists of a vowel sound and three consonants. Each group is color coded and the colors follow the spectrum sequence allowing for the incidental learning of this sequence as well. This color coding sequence lets children, teachers and parents know where in the sequence a child is working and lets children see and celebrate their progress.

Red- s, m, a, t
Orange- c, r, i, p
Yellow- b,f,o, g
Green- h,j,u,l
Blue- d.w,e,n
Purple- kqvxyz

I have created a series of activities that support the learning of each group of sounds. Each kind of activity or game exists for all colors of sounds. That way the children learn the process of how to play the game or use the activity and extend that knowledge to a different set of letters.

Some of the activities are for use by one child and others lend themselves to partner or group work. I wanted children of all learning styles have support  materials that entice them and enhance their learning.

I devote an entire shelving unit to the learning of sounds. Here is a picture of the set up in my classroom.

Cathie Perolman Sandpaper Letters Shelf

The sound baskets came from Wal-Mart (in the automotive department) and the colored baskets from Really Good Stuff. You can also use the white ones available at dollar stores and weave a piece of colored  ribbon through the slats to color code them. The extra shelves for each color are clear plastic stacking shelves from Staples turned upside down. (This is a great way to make the most of your space!) The colors under each section are non-slip shelf liner.

A Closer Look at the Activities

Sandpaper Letters

I place a colored ¾” dot on the back of each sandpaper letter and then cover that dot with a circle of clear contact paper cut a bit larger. I use the smallest circle from the geometric cabinet for that size. Children just look on the back to know in which basket each letter belongs.

Sorting Strips into Cups

Cathie Perolman Letter Sorting Game

Children sort strips with a single letter on each strip into a cup. As they sort the strips, they say the sound of each letter. This is great work for the very youngest children in the class.

  

Bingo Game

Cathie Perolman Letter Bingo

I created a bingo game with only nine squares that focuses on the letter sounds in the color group. In the first color group (red) each letter appears twice as there are only four letters and the middle space is a “free space.”  In the second color group (orange,) the orange letters appear and the red letters appear. This provides a review for the red letter group and practice for the orange letter groups. The “calling child” picks up a calling card and says the sound of the letter. Then each child covers that sound on their card with a colored chip. The game is designed so all the children “finish” at the same time.

 

Sorting Objects

Cathie Perolman Initial Sound Sort

Children sort small objects onto a card for each sound. There are three objects for each sound.

 

Sorting Pictures

Cathie Perolman Initial Sound sort Pictures

Children lay out the header cards containing the letters and then sort the pictures below them. There are five pictures for each sound. I placed dots on the back for a “control of error.”

 

X Out Game

Cathie Perolman Initial Sound X OUt Game

Each letter has its own card. There are four pictures. Three start with the targeted sound and one does not!  Children look at the target letter, say its sound and cover the letter that does not start with the targeted letter with an “x.”

 

 Dice Game

Cathie Perolman Letter Dice Game

This is another game to reinforce beginning sounds. Each child gets a card with four pictures on it. They roll the dice and say the sound that comes up. Then they cover the picture that begins with that sound. Each card is different. The red set has only four pictures but the other sets have five pictures and contain a review of two letters in the previous set.  I made the dice myself by painting wooden cubes with acrylic paint and then writing the letters on in Sharpie marker.

 

Building Words with the Movable Alphabet

Cathie Perolman Movable Alphabet Pictures

I have created a set of pictures that use only the sounds that the children have mastered. This makes word building successful for beginning writers. The first set of cards has only three in the set as it uses only the four letters in that first set. As the sets cumulate, subsequent sets have more letters and more picture cards!

 

Blending Words

Cathie Perolman Reading Cards

Once children begin to blend sounds to actually “read”, I have a set of “Blending Cards” for each color. Each set focuses on the sounds for the color group but uses the ones from the subsequent groups as well. I made the ones in the picture by tracing and coloring the letters using the movable alphabet. But you can hand write them or make them on the computer if you’d like. Using the movable alphabet allows youngest children to “map” the letters onto the cards. Another fun activity is for one child to “read” the card and another child to build the word using the movable alphabet. Then the blending card becomes a control card for the built word.

Those are the activities I have on my shelf. I hope they gave you some ideas!


If you’d like to recreate these materials for your class or homeschool, you can get your hands on all of Cathie’s printables.  She has put them together on a CD with a detailed instruction manual.  I think they’re fantastic and will save you a ton of time… specially if you’re just starting to put your language program together!  You can get more details and some free printables on CathiePerolman.com.  Or, email her at cathie@cathieperolman.com if you have questions!

-Seemi


About Cathie Perolman

Cathie Perolman

Cathie Perolman has been involved in Montessori education for over three decades. She has a BS in Early Childhood Education and a M.Ed in Elementary Education with a concentration in Reading. She has spent time working as a reading specialist as well as teaching students preschool through college.

She began her Montessori journey as a classroom assistant, and worked as a classroom directress, 3-6 team leader, teacher trainer and college professor.

Cathie is the author of Practical Special Needs For the Montessori Method: A Handbook for 3-6 Teachers and Homeschoolers and the creator of Hands on Phonics : a phonics based system of teaching reading to young children. She is a regular contributor to Tomorrow’s Child and Tomorrow’s Leadership magazines.

Cathie currently conducts workshops for teachers and administrators, works as a teacher trainer for various training centers across the country and as a school consultant. She currently co-teaches a Primary class at Nurturing Nest Montessori School in Columbia, MD. Cathie has been married to Gary for 34 years and they have two adult children and an adorable granddaughter!

 


Free Printables
Are you new to our blog?  Enter your information below to sign up for email updates.  Subscribers also get access to our Subscribers Only page where we host our growing collection of FREE printables.




You may also want to follow us on Pinterest or Facebook and check out our other printables on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Affiliate links may be used in this post at no additional cost to you.

Linked to these great blogs.

{ 5 comments }

This is the last of the 5th Anniversary Freebie Fridays for the summer!  Our students come back to school on Monday and we’re going to be busy getting our school year started.  I hope you’ve enjoyed the free printables this summer.

 

Today’s free printable features the Life Cycle of a Ladybug or Ladybird.   I’m experimenting with the fun and glittery illustrations made by Glitter Meets Glue Designs.  The blacklines are realistic, and the colored illustrations are glittery.  I’m curious to see how the students respond to this new style in the classroom.

Life Cycle of a Ladybug or Ladybird

 

 

 

How to get this printable

This set is part of our summer-long 5th Anniversary celebration where we’re sharing a new free printable every Friday.  All the printables are posted on the password protected Subscribers’ Page.  If you are already a blog subscriber, you will find the password in the most recent email update you received from us.  If you are not a subscriber yet, simply sign up in the box below and check your email to confirm your subscription.  The password will be included in your welcome email after you confirm.  See more information about subscribing here.




  Freebie Fridays

{ 7 comments }

This week’s 5th Anniversary Freebie Friday features the Life Cycle of a Honey Bee.   I’m experimenting with the fun and glittery illustrations made by Glitter Meets Glue Designs.  The blacklines are realistic, and the colored illustrations are glittery.  I’m curious to see how the students respond to this new style in the classroom.

Life Cycle of a Honeybee

How to get this printable

This set is part of our summer-long 5th Anniversary celebration where we’re sharing a new free printable every Friday.  All the printables are posted on the password protected Subscribers’ Page.  If you are already a blog subscriber, you will find the password in the most recent email update you received from us.  If you are not a subscriber yet, simply sign up in the box below and check your email to confirm your subscription.  The password will be included in your welcome email after you confirm.  See more information about subscribing here.




 

Freebie Fridays



Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

{ 1 comment }