It is my pleasure to introduce you to Simone Davies from Jacaranda Tree Montessori.  Simone runs a lovely Montessori playgroup in Amsterdam.  She is treating us today with a detailed tour of her beautiful space.  I am in love with her design aesthetic and gorgeous light in her room!  Enjoy the tour and be sure to stop by her blog to say hello!

-Seemi



A TOUR OF A MONTESSORI TODDLER CLASSROOM IN AMSTERDAM

I am super excited to be guest posting here today and to share a tour of my classroom here in Amsterdam. I adore working with toddlers and their parents helping them to introduce Montessori into their daily lives. And I love our space. Come look around!

Toddler Classroom Tour in Amsterdam

We are so lucky to rent this beautiful space. It feels like zen every time I arrive in the space. I love the neutral floor and walls so the children are really drawn into the activities around the classroom. There is lots of space to move, including a little outside area too. I have classes for babies, toddlers and preschoolers, but today it’s ready for our toddlers – children aged from around 15 months to 3 years.

Language Corner

Once you enter, first is the language area. There is space here for 8 vocabulary baskets and a selection of English and Dutch books.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 2 language corner reduced

There are 4 types of baskets:

1. The easiest have just objects for the children to explore, for example, a suitcase with summer clothing, or perhaps a basket of things you would take camping.

2. Then we have baskets with objects and matching cards, for example, kitchen utensils and then photos of these exact objects for the children to match.

3. The next difficulty is objects with similar cards. At the moment, one of the baskets has insects and then pictures of these insects in real life.

4. And the final type are just cards – continuing to build the child’s vocabulary.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 3 language materials reduced

The children are just like sponges in this age group – they have what Dr Montessori called “an unconscious absorbent mind”. So we are learning to use rich language with them as much detail as possible. For example, they love learning all the breeds of dogs, the names of different construction vehicles etc.

Kitchen area

Next you will see our kitchen area. This is a buzzing hub of the classroom where the children are welcome to make a snack any time during the session.

The children can choose to spread crackers, cut bananas, make orange juice or peel and slice apples.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 4 kitchen reduced

They learn to set the table – all the plates, glasses and cutlery are on a low shelf that they can access easily. Once they have made their snack, they come to sit at the table to eat, a great spot for children to observe others in the classroom.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 5 kitchen supplies reduced

And they learn quickly to pack away the dirty dishes to the washing up trolley. During the class, an older child often enjoys washing the dishes in our dish washing area. It’s a simple low shelf with two washing up bowls (one for soapy water and one for rinsing water), a drying rack, and underneath you find the aprons, a jug for filling the bowls, a bucket for emptying the bowls, and lots of towels :).

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 6 dishwashing reduced



Art and Craft Area

The art and craft activities are located next to a large window giving beautiful light to work by. The children can choose from a variety of activities ranging from drawing and painting, to gluing and cutting, and the always popular play dough or kinetic sand. Older children also enjoy sewing with a simple sewing card, darning needle and thread.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 7 art and craft reduced

I love how the children use this space. It’s all set up for them to help themselves. If they are busy practising cutting strips, they will find more in the small sets of drawers. They can get some more as they need to and are able to keep practising.

You can also see by the easel, there is an apron ready for them to put on, wet cloths for wiping the board, floor or their hands, and (to the right) there is a drying rack with pegs for the completed paintings. The older children manage most of these steps themselves. And the adult steps in when a child needs some assistance.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 8 easel reduced

Gross Motor Movement

In addition to the movement built into activities like fetching water for hand washing, flower arranging and the like, I like to have an area where the children can move their bodies. The green balance beam can be configured into different shapes and the children begin by walking with one foot on the balance beam, then perhaps holding an adult’s hand for assistance, and then balancing all by themselves.

I’ve also made a simple book of my children doing yoga with poses for the children to copy. They love to try these on the yoga mats which are always at the ready.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 9 gross motor reduced

Fine Motor Skills

If you keep going into the classroom, you find an area with two shelves of activities to work the child’s eye-hand coordination. We have a variety of puzzles, purses to open and close, a lock box, and activities for posting and nesting.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 10 manipulatives reduced

The activities are set up on trays or baskets so the child can easily carry them to a table or mat. This coin posting activity is the most popular activity in the classroom, perfect for children from around 16 months, and the lock and key keep it challenging for children over 2 years.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 11 Coin Posting reduced



Music

The children love playing music in the classroom. We have a beautiful xylophone that was passed on from a Dutch family that we adore. And a changing display of musical instruments to try. I also like to end our classes with a singing time – simple action songs with lots of movement for toddlers.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 12 Music corner reduced

Outside

We have a small but well-used outside area. The children water plants, scrub the decking, clean the windows and do lots of sweeping. In the summer months, they love playing with water too. And in winter, they put on their coats and boots and head out regardless of the weather.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 13 Watering Plants reduced

So that’s it. A quick tour of our classroom. I hope you enjoyed looking around. If you are ever in Amsterdam, feel free to come and visit us!

And thanks again to Seemi for inviting me to show you around. It has been fun to share our space with you. I hope you find it inspiring.



About Simone Davies

Simone Davies loves putting Montessori into practice. She is a qualified 0-3 Montessori teacher through the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) and mother of two children who attended Montessori preschool and primary school. She is from Australia and lives in the Netherlands where she runs a Montessori playgroup for babies, toddlers and preschoolers in Amsterdam. Visit her website here: www.jacarandatreemontessori.nl/blog.

Toddler Classroom in Amsterdam 14 simone profile pic reduced


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Pumpkin Patch Fun

by Seemi on October 10, 2014

in Language, Printables

I’m participating in my very first blog hop today!  I’m teaming up with a group of teachers for the Halloween Bash Blog Hop & Giveaway hosted by The Teaching 2 Step.  

I’m excited to see what everyone else has to share!  Be sure to click through the links at the bottom to check them out!

Halloween Bash Blog Hop Trillium Montessori

Are you new to our blog?  Click here to find out how to get all our free printables.



Pumpkin Patch Fun

We will be taking a field trip to the pumpkin patch in a couple of weeks.  To prepare, our classroom is starting to fill up with “pumpkiny” activities.  If you haven’t already downloaded my October Seasonal Guide for the Classroom with pictures of all our seasonal activities for the month, you can get all the details in the “Get Ready for October” post.

 

Pumpkin Patch Fun Phonological Awareness Activities



Pattern Pumpkin Matching Free Printable

FREE Patterned Pumpkin Matching Cards for Early Learners (CLICK HERE to download)

Here’s a closer look at some of the activities we have on our Phonological Awareness shelf:

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Shelf in a Montessori Classroom

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Shelf

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Poem and Sequencing Cards

Orange Pumpkin Word Awareness Poem and Sequencing Cards

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Sorting Syllables

Syllable Sorting Mats

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Rhyming Riddles Game

Rhyming Riddles



Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Matching Beginning Sounds

Beginning Sound Matching

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Ending Sounds I Spy Bingo

Ending Sounds I-Spy Bingo

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Sorting Middle Sounds

Sort Middle Sounds

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Point and Slide Cards for Segmenting and Blending Phonemes

Segment and Blend Phonemes with Point & Slide Cards



You can get all of the Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Activities in my TpT Store

Pumpkin Patch Phonological Awareness Activities

OR you can win the whole pack along with a ton of amazing materials in this awesome giveaway!

Get your entries into the Rafflecopter below!

 

Halloween Bash Blog Hop Prize Pack k-2_updated

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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  Wait!  There’s more!  If you need materials for older students, you can enter these additional giveaways.  Click on the images to take you to the signup forms.

 



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The Letter Race Game

by Seemi on October 8, 2014

in Language

I’m excited to welcome Cathie Perolman back to the Trillium Montessori Blog!  Last time she was here, she gave us a wonderfully detailed look at many of her letter work activities.  Today she’s got a great letter sounds game to share with us.  This is perfect for students who are in the “second period” of learning their letter sounds.  Enjoy!

-Seemi



The Letter Race Game

I wanted an interactive game that could be played by two children that would practice the sounds of the letters. This game is modeled after Snail Pace Race, a commercially made game but uses the letter groupings and color coding that is in our classroom. In my room each letter group has four letters except that last group which has six letters. Since a die has six sides I had to have six letters in the game. So I use the letters from the grouping and the vowel and one consonant from the previous group.

 The Letter Race Game  A fun way to practice letters

I made the game board from a white woven placemat that I got for a couple of dollars. Using a pencil and a ruler I carefully divided the space into six columns and seven rows. Each section needs to be large enough to hold the largest letter from the movable alphabet. 2 inches square was the size for us. I then embroidered the lines using blue embroidery floss. This took a bit of time and was well worth it.

The Letter Race Game 1

 

Next I needed to make the dice for the color groups. I bought wooden cubes at the craft store and painted them with acrylic
paint. I made one die for each color group: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple. I used a black Sharpie marker to write the letters on the sides of the dice.

Red:    s, m, a, t
(and on the other two sides I put an asterisk which means “roll again”.
This was necessary since the red group has only four sounds.)

Orange: c, r, i, p, a, m

Yellow:   b, f, o, g, i, c

Green:    h, j, u, l, o, b

Blue:       d, w, e, n, u, j

Purple:    k, q, v, x, y, z

Of course you could have any review letters you might want from the previous color group.

I store the dice and the movable alphabet letters necessary to play the game in a small glass bowl. My co-teacher eventually coded them with a circle drawn in the corresponding color of Sharpie marker. (The truth is they sometimes still get mixed up but it is certainly better!)



How to Play

In order to play one of the children has to know the sounds of the letters in the letter group. They then lay out the mat with the short side at the top of the table.  They say the sound of each letter as they place it in one of the squares along the top row of the mat.

The Letter Race Game

 

One child rolls the die and says the sound. (In my class the child who brought the work from the shelf to the table always gets to go first.) Then that sound moves down the mat one square.  Now the second child rolls, says the sound and moves the letter one space.

The Letter Race Game 2

Continue playing taking turns. This game lends itself to a lot of analysis and discussion. “First ‘guh’ was winning but now ‘errr’ is ahead. I think ‘err’ will win!”

Continue playing until one sound “wins!

This game is very popular and children play with a variety of partners.  Just keep an ear open to ensure that the children are practicing the sounds of the letters and not the name of them!

Have fun making and using this game!

- Cathie Perolman



If you’d like to see more of the amazing materials that Cathie uses in her Montessori Language Area, you can check out her site at CathiePerolman.com.  She has put all of her printables together on a CD with a detailed instruction manual.  I think they’re fantastic and will save you a ton of time… specially if you’re just starting to put your language program together!  You can get more details and some free printables on CathiePerolman.com.  Or, email her at cathie@cathieperolman.com if you have questions!

-Seemi

 


About Cathie PerolmanCathie Perolman

 

Cathie Perolman has been involved in Montessori education for over three decades. She has a BS in Early Childhood Education and a M.Ed in Elementary Education with a concentration in Reading. She has spent time working as a reading specialist as well as teaching students preschool through college.

She began her Montessori journey as a classroom assistant, and worked as a classroom directress, 3-6 team leader, teacher trainer and college professor.

Cathie is the author of Practical Special Needs For the Montessori Method: A Handbook for 3-6 Teachers and Homeschoolers and the creator of Hands on Phonics : a phonics based system of teaching reading to young children. She is a regular contributor toTomorrow’s Child and Tomorrow’s Leadership magazines.

Cathie currently conducts workshops for teachers and administrators, works as a teacher trainer for various training centers across the country and as a school consultant. She currently co-teaches a Primary class at Nurturing Nest Montessori School in Columbia, MD. Cathie has been married to Gary for 34 years and they have two adult children and an adorable granddaughter!

 



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Preliminary Practical Life Exercises



The Practical Life activities in a Montessori classroom are designed to be purposeful work that lead the child to an understanding of his environment and how it works.  These activities are appealing to the young child as they resemble everyday activities the child has seen adults complete.  The Practical Life Area of the classroom encompasses: Care of the Environment, Care of the Person, Grace and Courtesy, and Control of Movement activities (fine and gross motor).

At Trillium, we spend a great deal of time, at the beginning of the year, on the introduction of fine motor work.   Built in to these activities are the additional goals of helping the child increase his attention span and follow a sequence of steps.  These indirect goals help prepare the child to handle more complex activities in other areas of the classroom.

Our fine motor shelves focus on three basic skills: pouring, squeezing and spooning, each increasing in complexity as the year progresses.

Beginning Large Pouring With Handles

Beginning large pouring with handles

Beginning Squeezing Grasping Q Tips

Beginning squeezing: grasping q-tips

Beginning Small Spooning

Beginning small spooning

 



At first, each skill is taught in isolation until the child has become proficient at it. Then the skills can be combined to lead to more advanced, longer sequenced work.

Advanced Practical Life Baking

Making Corn Bread involves spooning, squeezing, and pouring

 

Due to the importance of learning these tasks, we have designed a sequence that allows for natural repetition to occur.  Weekly we change the color theme of the shelf, drawing the child back to these exercises to refine his movements.

Fine Motor Shelf Red

Fine Motor Shelf – Red

Fine Motor Shelf Green

Fine Motor Shelf – Green



Fine Motor Shelf Yellow

Fine Motor Shelf – Yellow

Fine Motor Shelf Blue

Fine Motor Shelf – Blue

The aesthetic appeal draws the child back to the shelf with the purpose of developing order, concentration, and coordination of movements during these first few weeks of school.

Because these activities resemble those that the child has seen in his environment it is important that they contain items that are real, breakable and functional.   We gradually introduce glass into the environment, as the child becomes more proficient with his movements.

Spooning and Pouring Rice with Ceramic Bowl and Pitcher

Spooning and pouring rice with ceramic bowl/pitcher

Spooning Pasta with Ceramic Bowls

Spooning pasta with ceramic bowls

Focus is also placed on the practical/authentic nature of these exercises as well.  We take time to help the child understand the real purpose of each activity to sustain his interest.  The child takes great pride in accomplishing these activities while building his fine motor skills as well as learning to keep his environment beautiful.



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Montessori At Home Mondays with Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Wow! Our last post in our Montessori At Home Monday’s series. I’m so excited to share with you all and thank you, again, Seemi!

Did you miss the previous posts? Check them out here:

Small Space: Introduction and Entryway

Small Space: Living Room

Small Space: Bedroom and Closet

Small Space: Bathroom

Montessori Setup in a Small Space Montessori at home 5 part series

 



 

 

 

The Kitchen

Small space kids kitchen table uses at trilliummontessori.org

The kitchen is my favorite place to have my children! I am part Italian and have been working in the kitchen as long as I can remember. I want to bring that same love to my children, so I have made their time there enjoyable.

Small space kids kitchen table uses at trilliummontessori.org

First, we have the table. This is an Ikea table and chairs. Definitely affordable and very easy to clean. The children can move the chairs in and our easily. This space served as our space for EVERYTHING! Art projects, experiments, water work, food prep, flower arranging, and, of course, meals.

When doing Montessori homeschool setup in a small space everything you have gets used in multiple ways. Often I perched on a stool next to this table to be with the kids are their level. They had so much pride in being able to complete tasks with ease because of the smaller size materials. I would encourage you to make a table a priority in your setup.

Small space kids kitchen low kitchen drawer uses at trilliummontessori.org

Low drawers are one of my favorite things to setup for the children. They are easy for kids to open and very easy to reach. This drawer we used for extra clean up rags for the inevitable spill and a couple utensils for cooking. The measuring cups are twofold. My daughter pulls these out as a nesting cups work. With my son, we use the measuring spoons for scooping and are always discussing the amount we are using. Of course he doesn’t really get what ¼ tsp is at this point, but one day it will click because he has always heard the number while we cook together.

I apologize for not having a picture of our cabinet setup for this apartment, but here is an example of another setup we had for our children in the kitchen.

Small Space kids kitchen low cabinet uses at trilliummontessori.org

This is a low cabinet, primarily for our son. On the left we have a couple of snacks he could choose to get to any time. His utensils are in the basket. The wire rack worked perfect to have cups on top and plates on the bottom.

The Montessori Method is meant to have beautiful thing, but sometimes beautiful, expensive things can break in the learning process. I was so excited to help Samuel work on his pouring with the small milk jug in the picture. The first time he took it out to work with it, it broke. We used that learning experience, first, to help him learn how to pick up broken glass carefully, and second to use our financial mind while choosing materials. The glass plates in the picture are from the dollar store. I found the small glass cups from a second hand thrift shop. I want to give my children all real materials to learn how to work with them correctly, but I do not want to break the bank by replacing expensive Montessori specific materials each time learning happens and something is broken.

Series Wrap Up

Montessori homeschooling in a small space is a lot fun! As a work at home mom, I found a lot of comfort in a small space. My children were always where I could see them and I didn’t have to spend hours every day cleaning and maintaining a big home on top of my online work. Because of our small space, I had the opportunity to focus more on my children; not maintaining an extravagant home.

I hope you are encouraged that any space can be make into a Montessori home and working within a budget is always possible. Although specific Montessori materials are beautiful and wonderful to have, your child will learn and thrive in a loving home with a little preparation.

I really enjoyed sharing our small home space with you!

About Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Marie is a work-at-home mother of two. She co- blogs at Montessori on a Budget with Kimberly Huff and Lisa Nolan. She is also a contributor to Confessions of a Montessori Mom blog. After much self-study and with a background in education, she chose to follow her own children in their education and created the blog Child Led Life. She would love to hear from you on FacebookPinterest, and G+.

Thank you for checking out our Small Space Montessori Setup!

 

 


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Can you smell autumn in the air?  Neither can I  :-) But that doesn’t mean it’s not here!  Pretty soon there will be a nip in the air, the leaves will begin changing color and pumpkins will start showing up on door steps.  It’s time for us to start thinking about how to bring signs of the new season into the classroom.

There are so many ways to sprinkle autumn themed activities around the room.  We have simple things like leaves, seedpods and acorns in our nature tray.  We’ll take a field trip to the pumpkin farm and pick some pumpkins to decorate our class with.  This also involves a lot of washing and scrubbing… one of the most favorite pass times of 3-4 year olds!  We’ll add orange and brown colored items into our art and practical life areas.



We have pictures of many of our October activities in the following posts from last year:

On the Shelves in October

Pumpkins in Our Montessori Class

October Printables

 



This year I decided to gather together all the pictures I’ve already posted, along with some new activities I’ve created, into one printable album for the month.  This way everything will be together in one place and I can use it as a reference for years to come.  I love how it turned out!

October Montessori Seasonal Guide Cover reduced

Here’s what’s inside

October Seasonal Classroom Activities Printable Guide



 

I’ve added it to the subscriber’s page so head over there if you’d like to download a copy for yourself.  It’s free.

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Montessori At Home Mondays with Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

I am excited to be back for part four of our Montessori At Home Monday’s series.

Did you miss the previous posts? Check them out here:

Small Space: Introduction and Entryway

Small Space: Living Room

Small Space: Bedroom and Closet

Montessori Setup in a Small Space Montessori at home 5 part series



 

The Bathroom

Small Space Montessori Home: Bathroom at trilliummontessori.org

We all shared one bathroom in our small home. We did a couple of things for the children in the bathroom to keep with their Montessori homeschooling.

The left picture is a station I setup for Avalyn to practice her care for self. A tray with a brush and small mirror next to her bows was perfect. Everything at child level.

The middle picture is a space for toilet learning. The mat helped keep that a defined space and Avalyn had everything she needed to work on her potty learning.

The right picture is a little setup in the bathtub. Each child has their own washcloth, cup, and toothbrush. Samuel also has a small container for shampoo/body wash. This helped him with using a small amount. Some parents worry about their young children pouring out the entire bottle of shampoo and this is how we avoided that being a problem, but still allowed Sam to work on his independence.

The Stool

Small Space Montessori Home: The Stool at trilliummontessori.org

Many Montessori homes have a learning tower for the children to use in the kitchen or other areas of the house. This is a wonderful tool to help children step up in order to be at a level to work on the counter. At the time we started using Montessori in our home, we did not have the money to buy a learning tower and ended up with this painter’s stool. We LOVE it. It is light enough for our children to move it around easily and very sturdy.

Above, you see Avalyn has moved the stool to the dryer to turn it on while helping me do laundry.

Check back next Monday for our Small Space Montessori Setup post where wrap up the end of our series and I’ll give you a tour of our kitchen and all the Montessori learning setup there.

About Marie Mack

Small Space Montessori Setup

Marie is a work-at-home mother of two. She co- blogs at Montessori on a Budget with Kimberly Huff and Lisa Nolan. She is also a contributor to Confessions of a Montessori Mom blog. After much self-study and with a background in education, she chose to follow her own children in their education and created the blog Child Led Life. She would love to hear from you on FacebookPinterest, and G+.

Thank you for checking out our Small Space Montessori Setup!

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 It is my pleasure to welcome Pauline Meert to the Trillium Montessori blog!   Pauline is a trained Montessori teacher with a ton of experience.  I met Pauline in Aubrey Hargis’s Montessori 101 Facebook group .  I was super excited to learn that she has written a series of early reading books that are sequenced according to the pink, blue, and green series popular in many Montessori classrooms.  You have to check them out, they have the sweetest hand drawn illustrations and charming stories!  Today she’s going to talk to us about some important concepts for the beginning of the school year.

-Seemi


 

The importance of grace and courtesy

Every new school year, I contemplate on the best possible way to begin the year. As Montessori teachers, we have all learned about the importance of the prepared environment, the meticulous way to present lessons, and the many other crucial aspects to offer children the best Montessori education. However, the more I teach and learn, the more I see that Grace and Courtesy lessons are what is most important to prepare for a successful year. Yes our environment must be beautiful, our materials spotless, our assistant trained, and our plan ready, but without Grace and Courtesy all our hard work could be worthless.

Montessori Classroom Pauline Meert

 

Grace and Courtesy lessons are the corner stone to how everything flows within the classroom, from how to shake hands in the morning, to how to ask a question, or solve a disagreement. These lessons allow children to be a part of the community and grow towards normalization.

Children starting around age 3 have a very sensitive period towards social interactions. Grace and Courtesy lessons not only meet that need but also offer children the tools they seek to be both independent and successful in the classroom.

It can be easy to want to start the new school year just the same as we ended the last. We have many returning students, we know where they are at and the lessons they received in the past. So why not just pick up right where we left off?

Children’s sense of time is very different from ours. Starting a new school year feels like starting from scratch. Thus, we must also take the time to revisit the basics of the classroom setting. As the returning children review, the new children can learn. Not only does this help create a sense of community but it also offers the older children the confidence to teach and support the younger students. As Montessori said in the The Absorbent Mind: “Our schools show that children of different ages help one another. The younger one sees what the older ones are doing and asks for explanations. There is a communication and harmony between the two that one seldom finds between the adult and the small child.”

So how do we present Grace and Courtesy? Everyone has their own way but the most common is through role-playing. Not only do the children learn well through witnessing the interactions and participating but they also find this fascinating and entertaining!

In my classroom, we spend a lot of time reviewing, roleplaying, practicing, and learning Grace and Courtesy. This builds a strong foundation for the rest of the year. Should Grace and Courtesy only happen in the beginning of the year? Of course not! However, once we have set in place a strong foundation, all we need to do is review throughout the year!

Here is a list of some of our Grace and Courtesy lessons

  • Greet someone
  • Watch someone’s work
  • Offer or refuse help
  • Ask a question
  • Interrupt a lesson
  • Welcome a visitor
  • Solve a disagreement
  • Serve food
  • Set up snack
  • Excuse one’s self
  • Choose a work
  • Walk in the classroom
  • Use quiet voices
  • Respect others’ work
  • Use materials appropriately
  • Line up
  • Hang up coats and backpacks
  • Sit at the line
  • Use the restroom

And of course, don’t forget that Grace and Courtesy lessons should not be restricted to the classroom environment but also transfer to the lunch area, the playground, and most importantly, the home!

What Grace and Courtesy lessons do you give in the first few weeks of school? What have you found to be most successful in starting the year off right?

More Resources

Grace and Courtesy by Trillium Montessori

How to Start a New Class by Trillium Montessori

The Magic of Grace and Courtesy by Peter Davidson

Grace and Courtesy by Primary Montessori Guide

Montessori at Home or School: How to Teach Grace and Courtesy by Deb Chitwood


 

Pauline

Pauline Meert is the lucky teacher to twenty wonderful children in a beautiful Montessori classroom. She enjoys making new materials and discussing Montessori with strangers. She can be found at
For Little Ones:  Pauline’s Etsy store where you can find her handmade books
Inspire Montessori: A Montessori resource for parents and teachers
Montessori Geek: Pauline’s Blog
Pauline’s Pinterest Boards

 


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